"All disease begins in the gut." - Hippocrates 

What we eat is perhaps the single most important thing we can do to in order to take charge of our health to reduce inflammation and therefore chronic disease. The following outlines a list of foods to eat and to avoid as part of an anti-inflammatory diet.

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{The List}

Eat This

Vegetables

Broccoli 

Cauliflower 

Onions

Garlic 

Leeks

Scallions 

Chives

Mushrooms

Beets 

Radishes

Carrots 

Artichokes 

Celery 

Kale 

Cabbage

Collards

Bok choy

Brussels sprouts

Watercress

Arugula 

Romaine lettuce

Green leaf lettuce 

Butter lettuce 

Dandelion greens 

Mustard greens

Spinach 

Okra 

Asparagus

Nuts and Seeds

Macadamia nuts 

Pecans 

Walnuts 

Pistachios

Pine nuts 

Brazil nuts

Coconuts 

Sesame seeds

Psyllium fiber 

Flax seeds

Oils, Vinegars, Herbs

Olive oil 

Coconut oil 

Avocado oil 

Cod liver oil 

Walnut oil

Macadamia oil 

All vinegars (without

added sugar) 

Parsley

Mint 

Basil 

Fennel

Fruits

In-season organic berries

Avocados 

Olives

Flours

Blanched almond

Coconut 

Hazelnut

Dairy Substitutes

Ghee 

Goat butter

Goat cheese

Buffalo mozzarella 

Coconut yogurt (without added sugar)

Coconut milk (full fat, canned, without added sugar)

Eat This 

(in moderation)

Meat, Poultry, and Fish

(4 ounces per day)- 

Grass-Fed and Grass-Finished,

Pasture-Raised, and Wild-Caught

Pork

Lamb

Beef

Organ meats

Eggs

Chicken

Turkey

Duck 
Goose 

Quail 

Alaskan salmon

Shrimp 

Scallops

Lobster

Crab

Calamari/squid

Oysters

Mussels

Sardines

Halibut 

Tuna 
Bass

Starches

Green bananas 

Green mangoes

Green papayas

Sweet potatoes

Yams

Parsnips

Turnips

Cassava 

Arrowroot

Other

≥72% cacao dark chocolate

Champagne (≤6 ounces daily)

Red wine (≤6 ounces daily)

Rum, tequila, brandy, vodka, bourbon, whiskey or scotch (≤1 ounce daily)

Avoid This

Processed Foods 

Breads

Pastas 

Sodas

Potato chips 

Tortillas

Pastries

Cookies

Cakes

Crackers

Muffins

Cereals 

Sugar- real or artificial 

Vegetables

Potatoes 

Cucumbers

Peas

Green beans

Chickpeas

Lentils

Soy

Nuts and Seeds

Peanuts 

Sunflowers seeds

Pumpkin seeds

Almonds (unless the skin is removed)

Chia seeds

Cashews

Oils and Herbs

Corn oil

Peanut oil

Sunflower oil

Vegetable oil

Canola oil

Grapeseed oil

Chili peppers

Bell peppers

Fruits

Zucchini 

Ripe bananas 

Ripe mangoes 

Pineapples 

Grapes 

Pumpkins

Squashes

Melons

Tomatoes

Eggplants

Dairy Products

Cow's milk

Soy milk 

Yogurt (including Greek yogurt and frozen yogurt)

Cheese 

Grains

Whole grains, wheat

Oats 

Quinoa

Brown rice

White rice

Barley

Corn and any corn product 

Rye

Flours

Farm-raised meat, poultry, and fish, including grain, corn, or soybean-fed

Choose high quality meats and seafood, including grass-fed and grass-finished, pasture-raised, and wild-caught to avoid the grain or soybean feed given to farm-raised animals. The way the animals are raised is important because any toxins that animals are exposed to are stored in the fat and passed along to us as we eat the meat. Note that even high-quality protein choices are listed in moderation because excess protein is converted to sugar in the body, which contributes to inflammation. 

Processed foods are perhaps the most important food group to avoid, as they are engineered to make us want to eat more. They are designed to trick our taste buds by delivering a sensation of salty, sweet, or fatty, which our brain is programmed to desire as a survival mechanism. However, the foods are devoid of the nutrition that our body needs, hence eating without the feeling of being full or satisfied. 

You may notice that some foods on the "avoid this" list are what we normally think of as healthy. However, as an evolutionary survival mechanism, certain vegetables, fruits, grains, nuts, and seeds produce a toxic compound called lectins in order to avoid being eaten by animals and humans. Lectins are known to ignite the inflammatory cascade and cause damage at the cellular level. Gluten is in the family of lectins. Casein A1 is a lectin-like protein found in cow's milk that should be avoided for the same reason.

Disclaimer: Always consult with a medical professional to discuss your specific needs and restrictions before commencing any exercise or diet regimen. The advice shown is not intended to be a substitute for individualized, professional advice.

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